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's foreign relations and what's next for president morrissey. washington redskins -- ♪ host: is this sunday, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfor
executives in washington, president obama said republicans' aid to examine the reality that tax rates will rise for the wealthiest americans. >> we have seen some movement in the last several days with some republicans. there has been a recognition that, maybe, they can accept some rate increases as long as is combined with a serious impediment reform and additional spending cuts. and if we can get the leadership on the republican side to take that kramer, to acknowledge that reality, then the numbers are actually not that far apart. another way of putting this is, we could probably solve this in about one week. it is not that tough. >> new details have been revealed in the retail giant kermit factory where 120 dacre workers died in a fire last month. "the new york times" is reporting that wal-mart played a key role in blocking the improvement of safety features at the bangladeshi factory. one representative helped quash a proposal that would help to improve safety investments, calling them not financially feasible. documents found at the fire scene also show five of the factory's 14
that reflects conservative ideas. match that with the researchers in washington that to the policy work for heritage. connell: i think a lot of people will hear or read about this today and think about the conversation we have been having about the future of the republican party. does the tea party still have, you know, lindsey graham just put a statement out saying he is very disappointed that demint is leaving. the conservative movement lost a strong voice. he will do a great job at heritage. is this part of that story? >> i think senator demint believes that the republican message going into the election was a strong one. it just simply was not well articulated. i agree with senator demint. i do not believe that the republican party has to transform its position and become more moderate. take an idea like economic growth. the difference between 2% growth and 3.5% is a different like night and day. senator demint told me he started his career as a market researcher and advertising. he knows how to communicate with people. he became very frustrated sitting in the senate failing to do a
will call the roll. quorum call: is en mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. ms. cantwell: i ask the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. cantwell: i rise to say what as important day it is for the u.s. coast guard. our communities who benefit from those services, the men and women who answer the call to serve. the reason i say that is because we have passed a bill that gives 40,000 active-duty coast guard members the support they need. it is a worthy tribute to a force of men and women that in 2000 alone helped us save over 3,800 lives across the u.s., confiscated over 166,000 pounds of cocaine and secured over 472 vessels before they arrived at our ports. this legislation will give the coast guard the funds that it needs to upgrade equipment and purchase the right vessels for carrying out every mission that they need. this kind of work exemplifies the heroes like chief petty officer terrell horn of california. officer horn died in the line of duty last week while tracing drug smugglers off the coast of california. our tho
to go before america goes over a fiscal cliff. an outcome looking more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." the latest negotiations comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. put bluntly, your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than a million dollars a year. and he wants to replace automatic cuts in defense spending set to start early next year with unspecified cuts elsewhere. the speaker pulled his so-called plan b for lack of support from his own party because many republicans still beholden to grover norquist and that ridiculous pledge want no compromise at all. the debate between the two sides centers around a balanced approach to the budget. republicans say president obama wants too much revenue. that's taxes in normal speak. and not enough cuts. >> at some point we have to address the spending problem we have. we can't cut our wa
that in washington and that those programs are a huge part of the conversation. host: democrats are saying it is off the table. guest: there are other changes they might be ok with. means testing in medicare which results in those who earn more pay more for their medicare premium. that is one proposal that democrats have begun more comfortable with. there are other changes they might be more comfortable with. host: ron has this suggestion from our twitter page. guest: that is a term we heard. when the cut health care, someone will be bearing the cut.t of that kin that is similar to the concept of those care organizations. they also include quality metrics as part of the contract, where they look at people's outcomes. one way to prevent against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the jan
treated with antikanticoagulant. jill dougherty, live in our washington bureau. what are you hearing? >> not a lot. since that statement sunday night, sanjay. they are really saying -- as you said, they are monitoring, and here is the statement so you can listen to exactly what they said. that her doctors are going to continue to assess her condition, including other issues associated with her concussion. because after all this happened as a result they say of that concussion, and they will determine if any further action is required. so it's really, you know, watch, wait, observe, and see how she's doing. this has kind of grown. remember, you know, the flu, then that leads to a conclusion and now this. so they want to be very, very careful, and as you as a doctor, sanjay know, when the secretary travels a lot. the blood clots can be very dangerous for anyone. we don't know where that blood clot is, that could be a very significant issue. in fact, her travel was on hold until the middle of the month. benghazi hearings, she will be many coing back this week. looking forward to work an
grover norquist pledge is actually incredibly misunderstood. it's based on what washington budgeting organizations call the current law baseline. what that means is that what scheduled to go into effect already is baked into the cake. and because the bush tax cuts are expiring provisions that were voted for ten years ago, it doesn't really count as a tax hike when they're already scheduled to take effect. so as long as republicans can just keep the revenue below what taxes would raise to in full expiration of the bush tax cuts, they won't be violating the pledge. >> kevin, that sounds incredibly reasonable. do you think grover norquist shares that interpretation? >> so there's an important distinction to be made between what the pledge actually says and what americans for tax reform, his activist organization advocates for. as grover said himself, the pledge is to the american people, not to grover norquist. so it's not just, you know, republicans need grover norquist's approval for what they want to do. it's more that americans for tax reform wants to keep tax rates low despite the
, they're going to make a deal in washington. i lived inside the beltway, have a pretty good network inside the beltway. cantor is worried -- excuse me, not cantor, boehner is worried about not being reelected as speaker of the house. they can't vote on that until january 4th with the new congress on that. cantor wants that job. so i think boehner's going to press for a deal, i think he's going to go ahead and allow president obama to raise taxes to 39.6%, and i think that'll take the edge off the fiscal cliff. david: let's take this discussion out of the beltway and into the real world. the economy, and, jeff, i want to start with you because you're bullish, but if you're so bullish, hy are you downgrading housing right now? >> because our housing team made a really good call on the housing stocks, and they outran their valuations on a short to intermediate-term basis. they downgraded them about two months ago. liz: okay, so where's the money? show it to us. >> i like just about everything except consumer staples. i think industrials look good, i think they are the new consumer sta
of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger h
states well above 2%. is anything that is happening in washington right now going to contribute? not at all. connell: you might as well come up with something. just make the most of it and move on. >> i would like to see the so questioner. it would show the united states can reduce spending. i think it would have a very positive affect. i do not think it reduces spending enough that it would have any real material effect on the economy. all right, dan, thank you very much. good stuff. talk about this number. 3.1%. on the surface, just look at that, that is not bad. john riding is here now to say that recession is, believe it or not, not off the table. >> absolutely. only if we go over the cliff in 2013. i am not worried about the spending side. it is the hundred billion dollars. it is the tax side that is the real issue. the economy is growing at two. we cannot make that. connell: we will talk about housing a little bit later. >> these are all good numbers. if you give the economy a chance, we could have that growth in 2013. connell: if you give the economy a chance. patch is ba
, washington, d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. there's almost nothing about human rights. this sends a terrible signal to the iranian public. it means that you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic becoming a nuclear-armed state but what happens in iran does not really matter to the washington elite. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and the initiative to make the human rights issues more important sends the right signal to the iranian public, telling them that you do understand that the government which is restricting its own population can also not be trusted when it comes to its international aspirations. imagine how it would be paid to behave. concerning the role about the revolutionary guards, it has inherited the religious state, something that was discussed by the previous panel. when the ayatollah khomeini was making press -- promises to the iranian people and 1960's and 1970's, he promised the people of iraq and not democracy. he promised them justice in this world
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say,
ii memorial in washington, d.c. this the ceremony includes remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chief. [sirens] ♪ ♪ ♪ ?eet ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, will be delivered by lieutenant colonel. >> our help is in the name of the lord who made help and earth. the souls of the righteous are in the hand of god. those -- be destroyed but the name liveth for ever more. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless of thanks thanksgiving and praise today. we reremember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against great tyranny. those who fought here at home and on the battle fronts to ensure that tyranny would not prevail. we thank you that in the hour of need you gave men and women the strength and resolve to stand no matter the cost. may those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of favor and strength. for those who remain with us today, receive renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we ask for y
to leave for washington tonight. congress expected to return on thursday. president, guys, not expected to actually arrive in washington until tomorrow morning. no talks scheduled that we know of as of yet. all the attention's going to turn to the senate, which tends to be more of a compromising body than the house is. >> yes. and the president is available in person if you should want to go over there and visit with him. or perhaps if he wants to visit with anybody else. the consensus seems to be if you get some sort of a deal, it's obviously not going to be the big deal. it will simply be something that extends the tax cuts for the vast majority of americans, at least those earning less than $250,000 a year. the consensus seems to be, carl, that if we don't get a deal by the second or third or fourth week, the super bowl week, we'll start to feel it in the economy. >> we had a notable sell-off. there is typically a bias on christmas eve, but the worst christmas eve performance for the dow since 2006 because of the jitters about the fiscal cliff. it will be an interesting few days as c
will become the 24th u.s. right to work staid state. >>> and cnbc is taking to washington today as we send becky quick, larry kudlow and jim cramim cramer to the white . they'll be leading off with a special mission critical rise above d.c. report. it's part tax. read, becky? >> like you said, we are occupying washington. this is where we've camped out all night. there's been all this talk about the fiscal cliff. we know it is fact approaching. we know it is something that would threaten not only the united states economy, but the economies around the globe. if we go over that cliff, there will be steep cuts and spending and steep tax increases that would automatically kick in. what we're doing here today is talking to our elected officials, talking to people who are involved in these talks, trying to figure out what will happen, where we are and if there's any way to avoid that cliff, if there's a good way to come about with tax reform and a close look at what's been happening on the spending side, as well. we have a lineup of a lot of gets who are here. joining us this morning, early on
been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center fo
and washington, d.c. because we've stood tall as good, honest partner with the chinese. but what's also incumbent on you is when you've earned that position occasionally you have to speak up. and i did. >> rose: as you know, when you speak up about china people also say "look at general electric, this great american company. they're exporting jobs as well." >> we have jobs all over the world, right? so we are the second-biggest exporter behind boeing. we're a net exporter in every other country in the world. but we will sell more gas turbines -- we have a 50% market share of the large gas turbine market. we will sell more in algeria in the next three years than the united states. so what are we supposed to do? are we supposed to sit here and just say, oh, it's too hard? >> rose: and if you don't get the business somebody else will. >> somebody else is going to get it. we're down to the point after 130 years that basically we're the only american company left and most of the businesses -- love us or hate us, we're the only american left. so i think you would be better off as an american citizen wa
live from washington. what do we expect to happen today? any new offers from the president or house speaker? >> we don't know. right now, all eyes on the senate to see what senate majority leader harry reid can cobble together to get some republican support. technically, it's still possible to come to an agreement. that said, politically is a different story, and the prospects for coming to a deal are starting to dim. right now, we're hearing a whole lot of the blame game. a lot of public posturing from both sides as they prepare for the possibility of going over the cliff. let's listen to harry reid. >> we are here in washington working while members of the house of representatives are out watching movies and watching their kids play soccer and basketball and doing all kinds of things. they should be here. >> now, the speaker of the house, john boehner, sort of retorting to reid, ali. in a conference call he said the leaders should do more -- or pardon me. less talking and more legislating. he wants the senate to take up a bill that the house has already passed to extend all rates
's is good. david: but not that good. lauren: number one thing is watch next week is washington, d.c. as we move closer and closer to the fiscal cliff everyone will be keeping an eye out on a big deal or could we see a big tax hike. only three weeks before we possibly go over. david: wonder if we trade the guns to avoid a deal for the fiscal cliff. lauren: you're onto something. david: maybe. i don't think they would go for that. "money" with melissa francis is coming next. melissa: i'm melissa francis. here is what is money tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for exports and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing in the way though is president obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags on the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to ni
council permanent member who deseptember ily seems to sell one thing to washington and yet another to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this l
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
that will allow us to realize that over the next number of years. >> christina with the washington times, thank you for coming to speak with us. u.s. officials have said several days moved up into the region, talked about why we send ships to the region, and, also, the number one concern with north korea's planned missile launch, whether they are violating u.n., you know, international regulations or whether we're worried that they could reach a missile to reach the u.s.. what's the number one concern with that, and why are we moving ships to the region? >> the moving the ships would be today moving them today or in the long run? >> today -- this week. >> oh, okay. well, we moved ships around the region all the time. we have a fairly robust deployed naval force that's actually, you know, stationed in that part of the world. we do move them around for exercises, move them around for contingencies, and in this case, you know, should seem logical we'll move them around to have the best situational awareness that we have, and to the drug that those ships are capable of participating in ballistic mi
, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i look at this from two perspective, the global forces that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power to united states and the west to china and the east hours of globalization in the digital era. how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threat of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at the time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated to our society. it's a new know mom that. --
just because i am in washington, d.c. i don't believe that. of course states can and should do it because some states may have a different attitude towards this in pennsylvania than texas. so you want to take into account many of these issues that are environmental issues and reassuring people locally about whether the procedures being used are safe and reliable. often local people can do a better job of explaining that or they may not want as much of it. they may want less. i thinks states have a right to be wrong in terms of competence. i just went through a hearing the other day on this meningitis outbreak that we had where people were taking these bad injections with unsterile stuff produced by a massachusetts compound and factory and it was the tennessee department of health that found out and they saved lives. the fda was not looking too good. but yes is the answer to the question. the epa and the federal government have delegated a lot of the responsibilities for clean air and water to the states. they can have an overview for that, but i like the idea of states doing it
that's what we should call the united states congress. more than 26,000 fans crammed into washington grizzly stadium to watch the annual battle on the gridiron. during the game, mostly during halftime when there's a break in the action, fans come up to me and say, hi, max, good to see. we start talking about football. but often turned to washington, especially the fiscal crisis. not once did someone say, don't do this, don't raise my taxes, don't count my favorite program. not once did i receive a parochial treaty request. my montana bosses told me again and again, max, just get it done. you guys need to work together. just get it done. i was really almost stunned at the unity and the intensity with which people spoke to me, get it done. now, these folks didn't ask for stalemates. they didn't ask for influx of billy. they didn't ask for our leaders to dig in over ideological things. they are pragmatic. american people want congress and the president to work together. they want us to tackle these challenges. keeping with the football theme, i want to show the words of vince lombardi,
this week, the national and capitol christmas trees were lit in washington, d.c. president obama and the first family participated in the 90th annual national christmas tree lighting ceremony. the tradition of the national christmas tree started in 1923 with calvin coolidge. house speaker john boehner joins the lighting of the capitol christmas tree. this year's tree is from the colorado white river national forest. watch both ceremonies tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c- span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care, and all the services that we had end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating, and you have got to step back and ask, you know, "are we hurting people overall on a global level? what are we doing sometimes?" now we have these reports saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care. when we step back, 30% of the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures -- this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being
cuts and tax increases. obama is scheduled to return to washington on thursday in time to restart talks. the u.s. president is asking congressional executives to compile a compromise plan that features continued tax cuts for the middle class. that represents a shift in his policy that called for higher taxes on the wealthy, along with measures to cut the fiscal deficit. talks between democrats and republicans came to a standstill last week. a deal still remains uncertain. the republicans canceled a vote on their compromise plan. that's because many republicans remain opposed to any kind of tax hikes. >>> china has opened what it calls the world's longest high-speed rail line. the railway links the capital city of beijing and ghangzhou in the south. shun ishibe have more. >> reporter: the first high-speed train for beijing is about to leave guangzhou south railway station. many passengers are carrying coats, because the temperature in beijing is about 20 degrees centigrade lower than here in guangzhou. the new line stretches nearly 2,300 kilometers, including a section already in service
energy. weypúre sure to keep itç all for ourselves.ç do you think the president andç washington in general cansget over that hurdle.ç >> it is a great pointç, what you're describeç something protectionism.zvçmyv it could be a cake and eat it too scenario. within eight years or now seven years as we turn into the new 2013 year it could be $50 billion economic impact to this country. so we're tripping over dollars to try to save pennies. weemight be able to impact the ecomy here. melissa: i know but, you know, there is so much of the country, there are so many environmentalists so many people on the left who hate generating energy. they barely wt us t generate enough energy to el our own economy and much less more and to actually go make money. i'm worried about getting over that hurdle. >> there are two theories. one theory is we'll never be able to export unlimited amounts of natural gas. if we do export it will be capped or it will be taxed so heavily the premium once pe liquify it, rigas it, go into europe or asia there may not be enough premium to make us competitive
in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both of our resources and of our innovative skills to help the country through these times and put us in a good footing for the next 50, 100 years. and secondly, i think this report really is the beginning of a process of creating an effective deep and stable bipartisan consensus on energy policy, in a town where everything is about the zero sum game. we are trying to escape that zero sum game. and we see the oil security as a unifyin
it was sort discussed in congress. the ruling is now. only washington are the words not known and appropriate not know. i think it's unequivocal that congress intended with the time frames that were put in there, the court overturned a something called the chevron hard-won our part to test. i think the will of elected branch was explicit and the court overturned the will of the elected on a very narrow ground and sent it back. >> you mentioned the one word we tried to get through, on sequencing. and i'm taking your testimony correctly, the lack thereof perhaps as far as how to cftc has handled matters, not putting words in your mouth. you want to elaborate? >> sure. first, i think the cftc probably more than any global regulator in the world has attempted to meet the 2012 deadline for derivatives reform, but in doing so they have assembled a confluence of rules but really i'll go effective at the same time in the next couple of weeks. weekend contest that, with actually provided to the market a sequencing plan, condition on certain foundational rules, such as what product definitions, that's
on in town. in washington news, both parties hinting at renewed talks on the fiscal cliff. the acknowledgement of open lines of communication passed for encouraging news. a new survey finds more than 60% of leading investment professionals predict a shorp stock decline in the market if the government fails to come up with a deal. in this case defined as a more than 10% drop in the dow. 56% surveyed foresee a deal to avoid the cliff by year end, 44% predict failure in the ongoing negotiations. as for corporate america, through yesterday's close, there have been # 70 announcements of special dividends. these special difference deebds are valueded a more than $30.1 billion. among the latest names, mcgraw hill will pay a special dividends of $2.50 a share before year end. and drop its previously announced plan to buy back up to $200 million more of stock this year. >> everybody's paid their dividends this year, so they won't be paying them next year. >> this is a major issue. what's going to happen is -- we have two great economists onset. but that money will get annualized, s
& prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just give you a quick sense
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
to the council on foreign relations in new york, duke says what's going on in washington could affect their holiday shopping plans. >> the week before the election, only 1/4, 25% of our core customers even knew what fiscal cliff meant. okay? one week after the election, it was up to 75%. now these same customers, 15% of our customers are telling us this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> and most americans aren't close to finished with holiday shopping yet. giving retailers a hope for a big boost in the last few weeks beforesom christmas. 58% of those surveyed said they completed half or less of their holiday shopping so far. i've got a little guilt on that front. >>> joining us for more, global ceo of sanrio. welcome. waving to the world there. >> yes. >> happy holiday. >> wearing your brand, as well. >> happy holiday from mr. mann. >> we should point out that mr. men is a key part of your strategy which is changing, is it not? >> exactly. last year we started to did mergers. this is our first acquisition, international acquisition. >> which is
ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science climate one. stephen schneider was a who was involved in the formation of climate one that[applause] sandy. new york? to place it in a modern context, we have to turn to proxy data like coral and ice to piece together the puzzle of how the climate buried in the distant past. it showed it was relatively warm. it was about a thousand years ago. recently that exceeded anything we have seen. it was featured in the summary for policy makers in 2001. when it became an icon, those who find the science inconvenient saw the need to try to discredit this graph. they saw discrediting me as a way to do that. some have been attacked for the work they have done. i was also bill of five. my book tells the story of what it is like to be a scientist and find yourself i
as washington welcomes a high-level chinese delegation led by the vice premier. his team is in the u.s. to talk trade and economy. he's expected to meet with u.s. treasury secretary tim geithner tomorrow. wang is the first official from the new leadership team to visit with the u.s. for more on the impact and implications of this, let's speak with frank ching, adjunct associate professor at the chinese university of hong kong. frank, hi. the first news that we're getting out of this appears to be more import duties s. this going to be the theme of u.s./china relations, or do you expect these meetings to be more of a thaw? >> well, i think that these are the first meetings since the new leadership in china was installed. and since president obama saw -- well, won second term. i think both sides want to make use of this occasion to improve their relationship. so this joint annual meeting is a platform, and i think that they will probably be able to achieve some progress on issues of concern to both sides. but i don't see any sweeping changes. >> what's interesting, frank, and you point this out,
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
in politics who don't like the republicans who do not like the democrats, who do not like washington, you know what they do like? they like barack obama because they sense something about him that he's not a part of it. so even that first debate there we thought was a debacle, a lot of us people thought "well, i liked that because he's not playing th game, he's not playing gotcha, he's not saying nasty things." that that helped the balance for him. >> rose: i'll tell you who didn't like it, his campaign staff. >> i asked, -- at the end of the interview i said to him i ran into somebody during the course of the campaign who useded to work for you who is now the mayor of a major american city. >> rose: could it be chicago? (laughs) >> and i said to him "what happened, rahm, in that first debate?" and rahm looked at me and said "he haa hawaii moment." and when i said that the president laughed very loudly and he caught himself back and he told this lovely story there meant meant that when things seemed to be going to hell in a hand basket he and rahm would sit in the oval office and think "what w
science and politics. and later, james hansen. >> tomorrow on washington journal, we will talk about the latest on the fiscal cliff with a columnist. that is followed by a look at president obama's cabinet for his second term. our guest is reporter david jackson. and then a look at what is next for iraq. we are joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c- span. >> i started to get word in the summer and fall of 1774. the british out of roles and diplomats were reporting to the crown the colonists are sending ships everye
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
, remember, they had a plot to murder the saudi ambassador right here in washington. and so when i look at the threat, it's not only this horrible prospect of what would happen to the world if they got a nuclear weapon, but it's what they do every day to try to project their aggressive image and attempt to, you know, influence the world. >> bill and hillary clinton are nothing if not political animals. who knows where the world or the country will be in four years? but it's hard to imagine that if history calls hillary clinton not only to be the first female president, but to be the first husband and wife to ever serve as president and then to maintain democratic control on capitol hill, can you imagine hillary clinton of all people not answering that phone call from history? it's just hard to imagine. >> when she was pressed, she said she would be concerned about her age. she would be 77 years old if she were to be in office two terms. but she has been traveling. she spent the equivalent of a year on the plane. >> just to show you how people are thinking ahead, newt gingrich gave a ver
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